Diet Culture: We Are At A (Fat) Crossroads

Everyone knows about the horror of yo-yo dieting and fad diets and most people have been on diets for years, on and off. Even BMI, the holy grail of “health” vs “weight” used by the NHS, was really designed in the 19th century only to measure statistical averages in the population, and people are starting to doubt its usefulness for individuals.  Meanwhile, Weight Watchers still has a turnover of $267.4 million a year, despite being a treadmill that’s almost impossible to stay on…

diet culture
So where are we really at?

Let me paint you a picture of how confused and conflicted our society is becoming about the F-Word (…fat!), diets and beauty.
Research suggests that up to 50% of the population (US) take part in disordered eating, whilst only 1-3% are diagnosed with eating disorders. Not surprisingly, as being fat is rated as more horrifying than cancer by school aged girls in the US. In response, Barbie becomes fat, tall, and short to try and move with the times and promote positive body image.

 

barbie release
From www.app.com

Meanwhile, in the “adult” world, models are shamed for their stick figure looks, or for being plus-sized, in the name of their health. Size 12 women are hired as plus-sized models, and supermodels are told both that they are too fat and too thin in the same day. Misogynists become the most honest people in the game, using PhotoShop to shrink down plus-sized models and undermine their body positive messages.

A size 14 Meghan Trainor insults thin women and uplifts everyone else with her rallying body positive anthem “All About That Bass”...or does she?

all-about-bass thin

An advert for protein powder promoting weight-loss sparks feminist backlash, then adverts for junk food become the enemy of the state, as London’s mayor proposes a ban on tube “junkfood” advertising.

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People are terrified of looking bad whilst exercising, so campaigns are launched specifically to break down that fear. The nation’s favourite meal is the classic roast dinner (nearly 700 calories), in a world that is increasingly designed for (sedentary) work and sitting down. Yet in the midst of it all, health advice about different food “baddies” and food solutions remains as stable as a drunken giraffe, and starts to look like a joke…

So where do we go from here?

Do we go with the body positive, lazy and weak turncoats who have rejected all hope of finally becoming thin? Do we instead side with the Instagram gurus and fitness advisors and hope that this time, we will finally be strong enough and informed enough to get the body and the health that we deserve?

It’s not an easy question to answer. Which is why I am splitting my answer into more parts! Come back next week, when I’m going to explore the mechanisms of the diet and beauty industry from both angles, covering both a history and where we are today with our opposing clans.

diet-starts-monday-leftover-cookies-for-breakfast-diet-starts-tuesday-af54c

 

In the meantime, thank you for reading, and consider subscribing to my email list or following me here on WordPress or on Facebook. Thank you!


Reading List aka The Links That You Should Actually Read Though:

On BMI: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/bmi-stop-measuring-weight-height-health-measure-fitness-fat-a7894951.html

Barbie’s New Look: http://time.com/barbie-new-body-cover-story/

Size 12 Women used as Plus Sized Models: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2835253/How-plus-size-models-really-skinny-girls-padding-size-12-size-16-three-easy-steps.html

The Protein World Ad: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/are-you-beach-body-ready-protein-world-backlash-grows-as-thousands-sign-petition-calling-for-removal-10204601.html

Living in a sit-down world: http://www.raptitude.com/2015/01/why-we-spend-our-lives-sitting/

 

 

 

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No Winners? It’s Not About Winning

Read Part 1 and Part 2 here!


Abandoning the idea of winning people over? On the internet? What is this heresy!

One of the heralded values of the internet is the freedom of speech and thought and self expression on it, but what is the point of self-expression if no one is going to be convinced?

We need, as individuals and “content creators” (however small scale that is; your Facebook status is miniature “content”) to adjust our goals.

Continue reading “No Winners? It’s Not About Winning”

Thinking Your Way Into Feelings; And Out of Confusion

Today I wanted to write about what I do when I get overwhelmed with emotions that feel completely disproportionate; essentially exploring my coping mechanisms for understanding and learning from strong emotions bought about by strangers and other people.

Most information I initially found talked about getting therapy or about simply calming yourself down, deep breathing etc. But I wanted something more direct and effective, something accessible and personal. After lots of research, I’ve found a self-help method that really works well for me, and I wanted to share this and see if this could help other people.

Continue reading “Thinking Your Way Into Feelings; And Out of Confusion”

“Crazy”, but not crazy enough.

Confession.

I often believe I’m “crazy”.

Whether that is mentally ill, neurodivergent, or just plain old bigoted insecure paranoid self-conscious crazy, it happens relatively often that it’s become part of my identity.

It’s lonely.

It’s difficult to describe without feeling over-dramatic; it’s dramatic but it’s also utterly mundane.

Continue reading ““Crazy”, but not crazy enough.”

My Life As A Potential Label Stealer (Autism)

So I’ve written previously about how I use labels that I don’t necessarily feel fit me because I find them helpful nonetheless. I didn’t get round to talking about autism and me.

My most controversial self-label flirtation is the one with autism*. It’s the one I’ve had the most pushback on, in the form of potentially rather ignorant statements like “everyone is a little bit on the spectrum” and a GP simply shaking her head at the suggestion, despite my 3 siblings being definitively on the spectrum since young ages. Now, I’m not claiming to be the epitomy of autism. Not at all. I’m clearly a very social person, with at least a temporary ability to communicate well and use body language, and I can see this, I’m not surprised when people see this and reject “autism” as a label for me.

But it is so useful for me. It fits so well into the words and the concepts that I need to describe my life and experiences and behaviours. Stimming fits with my pretty-much constant need to be fidgeting, mainly typical behaviours like picking at my hair or nail polish, but even writing it feels like a half-assed excuse and justification. Listing that I flap when I’m excited sounds like I’ve copied it out of a symptoms list, and only remembering that another close friend pointed out that I’m very “flappy” when I’m really happy about something makes me realise that this is actually accurate.

I don’t really need other people to find my labels valid, that is my point as a potential label stealer. I can get use out of the label and the language without needing other people to get it or to understand it, it’s a deeply personal thing. I find it useful to describe my obsessions to myself as “special interests” and to allow myself my physical quirks like clicking my fingers repeatedly or clicking my tongue on the roof of my mouth; I find largely that it helps with my sense of shame for those behaviours, to give them a name and a reason and a legitimate purpose as a neurodivergent person. (And I do believe I’m neurodivergent, as far as anyone who can pass as neurotypical can be, in fact, I often question whether everyone who’s supposedly “neurotypical” is like me, only hides it better, and then I realise how ridiculous that would be.)

Giving myself a label allows me to legitimately occupy a space I’m already living in; it makes my quirky weirdness and constant struggle to fit in a fact of my life, instead of aseries of challenges that I’m failing at simply because I’m inadequate. It makes my awkward responses to schoolmates/bullies logical, my gravitation to autistic peers more inevitable, my incessant fidgeting and fight to stop it more sympathetic (I don’t stop myself from clicking my mouth anymore, like I did when I was very little and in infant school, and can remember myself doing).  It means I can be kinder to myself and believe that I am in fact, doing alright as I am. I can give myself permission to be me with all my “flaws” because they’ve in fact got a name, and they are a valid form of existance.

*Actually, my more recent aquisition of the label dyspraxia is more controversial, having had a direct rejection from someone who has been tested for dyspraxia, because “her mother apparently also felt she had it once hearing that her daughter did, but her mother is just a very over-exuberant person and thus does not have it”. Yes, that story doesn’t make sense, because it’s possible to be over-exuberant and also dyspraxic, but nonetheless, it’s the seed of doubt that means I’m going to continue blaming myself for having my movement volume too loud instead of getting myself tested, at least for another few months. But this label is newer, so I’ve had less feedback. And with this kind of feedback, that trend isn’t likely to change.

Female Autism

Actually amazing resource on female autism… It’s considerably underdiagnosed in AFAB people (note: the data lacks a distinction between sex and gender), so this is a really interesting and educational read.

https://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/moving-towards-a-female-profile-the-unique-characteristics-abilities-and-talents-of-asperwomen-adult-women-with-asperger-syndrome/

The stigma around autism is, like most stigma’s, incredibly pointless. Life is a spectrum and we all have traits, and autism is just a name for having this particular group of traits, to some degree, and that is okay, because we are not all the same, and it definitely doesn’t mean there is, or has to be, a hierarchy involved. In fact, the talents of autism are often hidden or shamed, because of needless stigma.

One of my major pet peeves is people who make distinctions between “high” and “low” functioning autism, which is particularly influenced and elegantly explained in this post, by actually autistic and “low” functioning adult autistic woman with an amazing educational blog.

Another very important factor to remember is that, even in the images in the blog post about symptoms, it’s illustrated with only white women, and that is reflective of the general norm. Alongside the higher male-coding of autism, it is also massively under-diagnosed and recognised in black and latinx people, often mistaken for Borderline Personality Disorder or psychosis. (More on that in its own post later.)

More information (US-based) of diagnosis trends can be found here, in the CDC website (though autism is not a disease of any form, only a neurotype, so this is a misleading site name.)